Network Music Festival

A hi-tech musical weekender // 26-28th September 2014

TALKS

Sunday 29th January // 11am-1pm

Presented by Dr. Scott Wilson

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Co-operative Music Software and LNX_Studio – Neil Cosgrove

If you’ve got ideas, a computer and want to create music, you’re not on your own.
LNX_Studio mirrors virtual drum machines and synthesizers between computers on the internet. Choose your instruments, choose your beat and choose your style. Making music with your friends is fun and you don’t even need to be in the same room.
The talk will explore this technology and what goes on “under the hood” to make the experience possible.

Neil Cosgrove has 14 years of experience designing audio software in the SuperCollider language. Building on the knowledge gained from small and novel concepts, he now focusses on standalone applications. Having been both a programmer and bedroom producer, he has always enjoyed both using and creating fun musical gadgets.  As an independent developer he is an advocate of open source software and is currently working on LNX_Studio, an application designed for networked music collaborations.

http://lnxstudio.sourceforge.net/

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Radio freesound, supporting collective creativity on top of shared audio – Gerard Roma

Freesound Radio is an online platform that explores collaborative creativity on top of shared audio. The system provides an intuitive interface that makes no assumptions on musical or technical backgrounds of users, while making available thousands of Creative Commons licensed sounds from Freesound.org. Musical fragments are encoded as patches of sounds, which can be nested into other patches. Recombination is encouraged. Patches submitted by users are played by an MP3 streaming server.

Gerard Roma studied philosophy at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB). Following his interest in computer music he studied computer programming and worked for several years as a software developer. In 2006 he entered Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF) where he completed a master in information and communication technologies. He is currently a researcher and Phd candidate at the Music Technology Group in UPF, where his work focuses on computational models and techniques for collaborative music creation.

http://radio.freesound.org

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Network[ed] Listening – towards a de-centering of beings – Franziska Schroeder

This presentation questions modes of listening; specifically it draws on the author’s experience as a performer listening in network environments. It ties into the theme of the Network Music Festival by examining listening in/as well as to the network. It is an extension to a text developed in 2009 (Schroeder 2009), and constitutes one specific way of defining a mode of listening as seen by one performer with one specific instrument playing a certain type of music. It must be understood as a culturally variable listening that Paul Carter has described as a listening “subject to the prevailing ideologies and power relations of a given place at a given time” (in Veit Erlmann, 2004, p.3). Listening is understood as an embodied mode, shaped by socio-political and cultural concerns, and I will touch upon writings that address listening in such a corporeal light (Born, 2010 and Voegelin, 2010).
I will argue that network[ed] listening is an ideal corporeal state for rethinking linear conceptions of the other and a subject’s own relation with her world, and that network[ed] listening posits listening as a corporeal and multi-dimensional experience that is continuously being re-shaped by technological, socio-political and cultural concerns.

Franziska Schroeder is a saxophonist and theorist. She was awarded her PhD from the University of Edinburgh in 2006, and has since written for many international journals, including Leonardo, Organised Sound, Performance Research, Cambridge Publishing and Routledge. She has published a book on performance and the threshold and an edited volume on user-generated content.Franziska has performed with many international musicians including Joan La Barbara, Pauline Oliveros, Stelarc, the Avatar Orchestra, and Evan Parker. Franziska has released two CDs on the creative source label, and a recent CD with Slam records.Franziska is on the steering committee for the DRHA (Digital Resources in the Humanities and Arts) conference, for which she was the Program Chair in 2010. She currently is the Artistic Director for the Sonorities Festival of Contemporary Music, Belfast. Franziska was an AHRC Research Fellow (2007-2009), where she investigated network performance environments, and is currently a Lecturer/RCUK Fellow at the School of Creative Arts, Queen’s University Belfast.

http://www.somasa.qub.ac.uk/~fschroeder/

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Network Performance at the Sonic Arts Research Centre – Pedro Rebelo

An overview of research in network performance at the Sonic Arts Research Centre, Queen’s University Belfast. We have started developing strategies for composition and performance in the network since 2005 and work in this area has produced commissioned creative work (compositions, performances and installations) as well as publications in journals such as Contemporary Music Review and Organised Sound. The SARC research team working on network performance has been addressing key issues relating to distributed creativity, transmission, geographically displaced performance and locative media. At the centre of research in this area at SARC is the notion of network dramaturgy which addresses issues of presentation and authorship in a dynamic network culture. The talk will be illustrated with examples from recent projects including work developed in the context of the EU Culture 2007 CoMeDia project.

Pedro Rebelo is a composer/digital artist and performer working in electroacoustic music, improvisation, digital media and installation. In 2002, he was awarded a PhD by the University of Edinburgh where he conducted research in both music and architecture. His music has been and published, recorded and performed across international festival. His work as a pianist and improvisor has been released by Creative Source Recordings and he has collaborated with musicians such as Chris Brown, Mark Applebaum, Carlos Zingaro and Evan Parker. His writings reflect his approach to design and composition by articulating creative practice in a wider understanding of cultural theory. Pedro has been Visiting Professor at Stanford University (2007) and was Music Chair for the 2008 International Computer Music Conference and for the 2009 Sound and Music Computing conference. He has had posts of Director of Education and Acting Head of School at Queen’s University Belfast and is currently Director of Research at the Sonic Arts Research Centre.

http://www.sarc.qub.ac.uk

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Networking memes of din is noise – S Jagannathan

din is noise is a free software musical instrument for the GNU/Linux operating system. In this talk, the author explores these networking memes in din:
1. 1 to many:
The design of din encourages a fully improvised performance that can be streamed over the Internet (this author streams at http://lurk.org:8000/din.ogg). A performance is announced impromptu on Twitter. This could be at anytime of the day or night. A scale (or raga) maybe chosen to suit the mood of the performer & the time of the performance. The performance then proceeds and takes as long it takes or when there are no listeners! 🙂 Thru out the performance the performer interacts with their listeners on Twitter or an IRC channel.
2. many to 1:
din has an IRC bot that a performer uses to connect to a password protected IRC channel. The performer’s fans (from all over the world?) have logged into this IRC channel and can influence the sound of the performer’s din by simply messaging valid din commands to the performer’s bot. The bot takes such a command and runs it on the performer’s din changing its sound (can change other things too!). If the performer is streaming din’s sound (see 1.), fans can listen to the effects of their commands.
3. bot(s) to bot(s)
din bots can route commands they have received in the IRC channel to other din bots connected to the same channel. A networked orchestra of dins is possible.
4. telemetry/diagnostics & MIDI:
a practical use of the din IRC bot is to offer remote technical support — the developer(s) of din could probe the suffering user’s din by sending valid din commands to the din IRC bot and examine their command’s output. Input captured by MIDI controllers connected to a user’s din can be routed to other din bots (ie other dins) for remote conducting, performance etc.

S Jagannathan is a Free software maker from Chennai, India now living in London, UK.

http://dinisnoise.org

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